Cheryl Swope Archive

Lifelong Burden … or Blessing

This morning my son and I discussed literature. Specifically, we noted a good author’s ability to challenge and strengthen the mind and character in ways mere escapist entertainment never can. Michael wants to protect his mind, because he fears the long-term prognosis of some of his conditions. He does not want to lose the ability …

20 Ways to Calm a Wiggly Child

Teach him to read well. Stop his body from moving before giving a verbal direction. Give clear, short directions he can follow. Minimize auditory and visual distractions during work time. Provide headphones or earplugs and a supervised “office” area for independent work. Teach in a small, contained area with clear physical boundaries. Provide a visual …

You Can Give Your Child the Joy of Knowing

Perhaps your child struggles with attention or concentration, speech or language, sensory or intellectual function, emotional regulation, reading, writing, or other aspects of learning. Whether you have been trying to teach him for years, have recently pulled him from a disappointing or unsuccessful program, or are just now in the earliest stages of research, now you can teach your …

Special-Needs Q&A: Summer 2016

Shining Like the Stars Forever and Ever In the book Simply Classical, I share how my two children, despite their significant special needs, benefit from a classical Christian education which not only strengthens their minds, but also impacts their souls. One recent event underscored what this kind of education can do for our children, and what it can …

The Well-Formed Person

The education we now call “classical” is our heritage as human beings. With roots reaching back to the greatest teachers and philosophers of all time, a classical education forms the student’s mind, character, and tastes by inclining him toward truth, goodness, and beauty. We trace classical education to the ancient Greeks, who prized wisdom and …

A Case for Occasional Silliness

Far and few, far and few Are the lands where the Jumblies live. — Edward Lear Amidst all the academic rigor, children need a little nonsense. Not only do we love to hear our children giggle, nonsense stretches a child’s mind. A little silliness can take them to unexpected, liberating places. We could research scientific …

Special-Needs Q&A (Summer 2015)

Q. How will my special-needs child benefit from literature? A. Some special-needs children enjoy messages conveyed through simple picture books. In Frederick, by Leo Lionni, a little mouse cannot assist his family in the usual manner of hard, physical labor. He is not strong like the others. Instead, in days of distress, Frederick shares his small …