Tag Archives: classical education

The Contemplative Reader

The contemplative reader

How we approach a book can parallel the way we approach life itself. We can spend our time merely in pursuit of pleasure or we can strive toward a higher goal—the pursuit of what John Henry Newman calls the “philosophical habit of mind.” We would never dismiss the pleasure that reading can bring, but we […]

Raising Human Beings in a STEM World

Several years ago, I was asked by a lady who was starting a classical school if I would come give a speech to an education group in her community. I had planned my usual talk in which I discuss the advantages of a  classical Christian education, but on the way there found out that this […]

Memoria Press Curriculum

Memoria Press Curriculum

What is a classical education? The essential core of classical Christian education includes the study of Latin and the classical civilizations of Greece and Rome. — Cheryl Lowe What is the goal of classical education? Classical education focuses on the development of the whole student—heart, mind, and soul. It strives to give students a broad […]

Letter From the Editor Summer 2022: What We Have Forgotten About Teaching

Little kid standing

I was asked to speak to a gathering of classical educators recently on the issue of “pedagogy,” the science of how to teach and a word to which modern educators are very attached. One of the major points I made in my speech was this: Pedagogy is not the most important thing in education. It’s […]

Strategic Study Habits

Latin Curriculum books stacked on one another

Arguably, the greatest student-teacher relationship in ancient history was that of Alexander the Great and Aristotle. Although Alexander’s genius contributed enormously to his success, there is no doubt that Aristotle’s tutelage also served to shape his famous student. In his book, The Life of Alexander the Great, Plutarch recounts how Alexander treasured his copy of […]

Letter from the Editor Spring 2022: Civilization by Candlelight

Civilization by Candlelight

The expression “dark ages” refers to the period of time after the fall of Rome in the fourth century A.D. until the resurgence of learning in Western Europe that started in about the eighth century. We  call it “dark” because the light of learning that had been ignited by the Greeks and carried on by […]

Truth for All Nations

Truth for All Nations

The Christian Church and classical education are a match made in heaven. In the Gospels, Jesus makes it clear that the kingdom of heaven also belongs to children and even infants (Matthew 19:13-15; Mark 10:13-16; Luke 18:15-17). St. Paul tells Christian fathers not to provoke their children to anger but instead to raise their children […]

Mama Care

Mama Care

“I think I need to go to the hospital.” Those words felt really melodramatic, but I had just texted them to my husband. “Don’t worry,” he said. “Help is on the way.” I couldn’t move; I just kept staring into space. It felt like my brain was broken. I was terrified. A knock at the […]

Boys, Men, & Poetry

Boys, Men, & Poetry

Amid the bustle of boys just released from school, I searched the crowd for my 12-year-old son, Louis. He approached me with tears in his eyes. Both he and his younger brother, Ben, had competed as finalists in their school’s poetry recitation competition that day. The previous year, the boys had won first place together. […]

A Communal Feast

Communal Feast

In some circles the word “curriculum” is anathema. It is far better, this thinking asserts, to take a relaxed approach to education, to teach a la carte, or to let the child decide what and when to study. We must not be “dogmatic.” Different children must study different things—or so we begin to believe. We […]